In Which I Attempt To Prove I’m Not a Complete Numpty

Remember my kimono wrap that turned into a Sorbetto top that was then turned into the bin….

..and my troubles with a crocheted dog’s nose?

Well, just to prove I can triumph from time to time, I will cast modesty aside and show you my Ultimate Trousers which fit me so well I daren’t put on or lose the tiniest bit of weight.

Made from this pattern by Sew Over It, they are very simple being four pieces plus a waist facing and an invisible side zip – the secret of course is getting the fit right.

I’m not overly keen on stylised pattern sleeve drawings because these trousers don’t really come out as narrow as that – well, not on my skinny legs they didn’t – but that can be changed along with the other fitting issues.

I signed up for a couple of lessons with a local teacher who is multi talented in that you can go to her with projects from patchwork to upholstery to dressmaking and lots of other things in between.  I thought if I could just get the fit right on these, being such a simple style,  I could use the altered pattern on any future trousers I might be tempted to make.

Anyway, it was very helpful to be pinned in professionally and guided through where I needed to make the alterations.  My crotch was O.K., you’ll be delighted to learn,  but my hips were way out and I wanted the legs narrower so I made the toile in a U.K. size 12 and then much pinning of seams was done by the teacher.    The resulting block veers between a size 8 in places through size 10 and I think the waist stayed at a size 12 albeit with a pinch taken out at centre front and back.  No wonder my original pair that I made straight out of the packet don’t come anywhere near fitting me.  Having said all that, there is a sew-along on Sew Over It’s blog which guides you through fitting issues but being professionally pinned in was very helpful as it would have been difficult to do that myself and it’s not something I would entrust to family members for many and various reasons.

So, a side view with me hitching up my t-shirt to show the whole thing.

and a back view to show you that success is possible even when you have a fear of trousers/pants which I was disappointed to find there is no word for – after all, there is even a word for a fear of beards (pogonophobia) and it’s not as if you see people running down the streets in panic when they see a bearded man or blocking up their chimneys at Christmas in case they catch sight of Father Christmas’s snowy white example.  Anyway, I digress.

This fabric was admired by those in the sewing class although I wouldn’t normally wear patterned trousers but this was something I had in my stash, I think originally intended for a shirt dress. However, they could be a wearable toile as long as I don’t eat too much or too little (the latter being less likely).

Anyway, I went to my bin, shook off all the bits of thread and pattern tissue paper thrown on top of it and retrieved the failed Sorbetto top.

I cut off the sleeves (which were a hack of the original pattern anyway) and bound the armholes with the same stuff I’d used for the neck….

….which looked fine and also served the purpose of getting rid of the slight puffiness on the shoulders I’d managed to incorporate when setting in the sleeves…..

……did a rolled hem on the overlocker

…… et voila.

It’s not perfect but it’s not in the bin either and Mlle. T. the Younger has already hung it up in her wardrobe ready for the warmer weather.

I’m now on the hunt for the perfect fabric to make another pair of trousers – not denim, not stretch and preferably not overly patterned – anybody got any suggestions?

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Animal Faces

Remember my ‘butternut squash’ dog that I was making using the ‘Edwards Menagerie Dogs’ Book?

He was looking a bit sad, which isn’t surprising as he hadn’t been sewn together yet and had a knitting needle through his head to hold it on to his body for photo shoot purposes which I don’t think would be anybody’s position of choice.  I say he was looking sad but, not having a face, we could only guess at his emotions although I think the body language was clear.

Anyway, the reason I don’t usually make toys of any description – or one of the many reasons – is that I can’t get those features right.  I’m not at all skilled with embroidery threads of any sort .  However, having ‘rediscovered’ crochet fairly recently, I wanted to try my hand at amigurumi because there are lots of cute ones out there and I haven’t done much crochet in the round so thought it would be a challenge.  Impatient to start, I only had this very chunky wool available in a vaguely suitable ‘dog colour’ and that’s why I went for the large size to start instead of the standard.  I think that is what scared me most about adding the nose and eyes so I asked my friend Sandra – who has made quite a few toys and is also au fait with the embroidery side of things – to do the nose for me.

She was a bit disappointed with the result but I pretended to be happy and brought him home.  She doesn’t read my blog (I hope) so I’m going to unpick it and try it myself.  I don’t like the eyes either.

Any tips would be appreciated but, firstly, I think the features should maybe be chocolate coloured instead of black.  Secondly, I think the nose might be too big (as well as being a bit on the wonk) and, thirdly the eyes are probably too high up.

What do you think?

Other than that, I think he’s kind of cute – I say ‘he’ but I think this might be a girly dog for some reason – I’m getting a feminine vibe off this particular arrangement of yarn which is not something you hear me say every day.

 

Leon is unimpressed.

Mac thinks it’s hilarious

and I think we can all tell what Yuki thinks of it.

Sorry about that last bit but, the post is called ‘Animal Faces’ and any excuse to put photos of my lovely cats on the blog, especially when they’ve obliged me with such ‘appropriate’ expressions, is not to be ignored.

Seriously though – if you can offer any advice on getting features looking just right, I’d be very grateful.

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From Kimono to Sorbetto to Oh, No!

Back in dressmaking mode, I ordered some fabric online.  I know, I know, I’ve got plenty in my stash – although not as much as in my patchwork stash but we won’t go there.  Anyway, I fancied this ‘satin’ type fabric would make a nice kimono style robe to wear in the mornings to replace my big fluffy dressing gown now the days are getting (a bit) warmer.

I searched for a freebie robe tutorial online and found one here 

I should know by now that free online patterns and me do not go together well especially where measurements and calculations are involved but this one seemed very simple.  After all, it basically involves five rectangles.  I did notice, in the comments, some people had found the measurements resulted in a somewhat ‘skimpy’ fit so cut it out a little bigger.  At least, that was until the ‘satin’ slid about under my rotary cutter and I ended up having to trim it up a bit where the bottom layer had shifted out of place.  Pressing on regardless, I got the thing sewn up and looking gorgeous – until I tried it on and realised I couldn’t actually move my arms in a forward direction without risk of hearing the ripping of fabric.

Mlle. Tialys the Younger had admired the fabric so I thought I could salvage enough to make her a Sorbetto top.  This is a free pattern from Colette which I have actually had lots of success with in the past.

All was going O.K. until she tried it on and the shoulders were too wide so I took them in but alterations aren’t my strong point and there was a bit of puffy action going on here and there.

Still, I thought she could live with that and proceeded to bind round the neck and sleeves.

I used commercial binding because I couldn’t bear the thought of making it myself with the satin fabric which moves and shifts and generally makes a nuisance of itself badly enough without trying to make binding out of it.  I couldn’t find any satin binding locally though so used the stuff that is usually available which is of some unknown cheapo material and a bit stiff.  You know what’s coming don’t you?

Flushed with the success of  neck and sleeve binding and wilfully ignoring my better instincts, I bound the hem too.  Which, as you can probably guess, removed the drape and made the hem stand out from the body in a way I couldn’t possibly pretend was intentional.

Shame – the back looked very nice.

If the sleeves had been perfect I would have taken the time to unpick the binding from around the hem but, it wasn’t, so rather than spend more time on what was, in any case, a second go round, I decided there was only one thing to do.

Sometimes it’s just best to move on and get on with your life.

I have learnt some good things about binding and some bad things about slippy fabric so as long as I remember those things next time, which is not guaranteed I’m afraid, the process will not have been a complete waste of time.

I have also learnt that ‘pressing on regardless’ and ‘ignoring my better instincts’ are stupid things to do.  Lessons I’m sure I have encountered many times before but, again, sometimes I live and learn and sometimes I just live

Satin – especially the type that is cheap and creates electricity when you move – is now dead to me.

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Easter Weekend

We made a decent amount of money for the Twilight Retirement Home for old and disabled doggies on Saturday despite the weather being mostly against us.  Eight out of my ten tea towel into apron conversions sold so I was gratified I hadn’t wasted a whole afternoon last weekend cutting off corners and adding turquoise tapes.

Sunday and Monday yielded some sunshine and, so unused to such a phenomenon have I become, I burnt the backs of both hands whilst doing some open air crochet.

The butternut squash dog is looking promising so far…………

……..don’t you think?

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Is It Woolly Going To Be A Dog?

Having honed my crochet skills on blankets – an ongoing process by the way – I’ve never tried amigurumi.  Difficult enough to say the word, I’d always intended to give this sort of crochet a go and even bought a couple of pattern books but, when the Dog one came out it was a ‘had to have’.

Not that I need more dogs in my life but I thought, if they were quick and easy enough, they might be a good thing to sell in aid of Twilight, the home for old and disabled dogs I support.

It will be a while before I get to the long haired varieties like this.

Photo from Book

So I thought I’d start with a beginner pattern – a little labrador

Photo from Book

Searching through my yarn stash, it became clear that I had no ‘neutral colours’  i.e. black, grey, white, cream in the required thickness.  However, I did have some oatmeal coloured yarn in ‘Chunky’ which meant, if I wanted to make a start straight away, I’d have to do the large sized dog – there are three sizes to choose from for each dog – it’s just the size of the crochet hook and the thickness of the yarn that changes.   So that’s what I’m doing – not a little labrador but a large labrador.

Any resemblance to a big butternut squash is purely coincidental.

For scale see the vintage wig stand behind which is, more or less, about the size of an actual human head.

I wouldn’t mind but the dog’s head is a slightly smaller butternut squash which I will attempt to balance atop the body once I’ve got the legs on for stability.  I’ll let you know how that goes :/

The Twilight Easter Fair fundraiser is next Saturday where we are raising money to make life more comfortable for the for old and disabled dogs who have been abandoned or who have been separated from their owners for one reason or another.    I don’t think I’ll be churning these out quickly enough to be able to put them up for sale by then – certainly not at this size – but I’ll have to buy in some neutral colours in double knitting  yarn in order to make some smaller ones which – looking into the future – might be ready for the Christmas Fair and, by that time, I might have progressed to the shaggier versions.

Meanwhile, I have another nine Twilight tea towels to turn into aprons before next Saturday so I’d better leave ears, legs and tail until after then.

The weather here continues to be complete pants and the real dogs are bored.

Flo couldn’t even be bothered to choose which woolly doggy she wants me to crochet for her to play with.

 

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36 Comments

Spontaneous Sewing

At the moment, I am attempting to face my nemesis – the trousers (or pants if you are of the American persuasion) – and try to fit a pattern made for somebody with a bottom to somebody who hasn’t and that would be me.  I have  never been able to balance a wine glass on my generous behind like a Kardashian nor will I ever be described as ‘bootylicious’ but, back in the day, it wasn’t so fashionable to have a big bum so it never bothered me and these days nobody really cares about the size of my derrière apart from me and , even then, only enough to get a pair of trousers to fit it.

There are some sewing classes available locally which some of my friends attend regularly but I thought I’d go along for a couple to see if we could get my fitting problem sorted so I made a quick toile and took it along to the class where it was pinned and adjusted to the extent that I don’t think the pieces bear any relation to the original pattern any longer but do seem to fit me better now.  I will let you know how that turns out.

Anyway, last time I used one of the teacher’s spare machines but I thought I might take my own next time as I’m so used to it.

Here is my naked machine.

Sometimes, when I remember, I put the machine cover on to keep the dust off it.

You’ve seen the front of this before so here’s the reverse side – I had a garage in mind –  just for a change.

However, this is definitely a ‘stay at home’ cover as it’s big and bulky and there is no carry handle.

You know those times when you go into your workroom or workspace and have absolutely no idea what you’re going to do and then, suddenly, you do?  Well, that’s what happened here – time to make a ‘going out’ cover.

I basically followed a tutorial I found here and, although I debated making patchwork sides, I decided against it in the end and used some stash fabric I had lying about.  I lined the interior with plain green cotton, put wadding between the layers for a bit of protection and quilted the lot with a simple diagonal.

The tutorial includes a fairly ingenious way of making the slot in the top for the handle which took me quite a bit of time to work out (my poor brain) but, once I got my head round it, worked really well.  It involves some interfacing and a bit of tricksy turning and voila!  I can’t explain it any better than the original – can you tell? – so I won’t try.

I constructed the side pockets as per the tutorial.

I finished off the bottom edge in the same, ready made single fold binding I used for the pockets as I have a big roll of it in my stash.

I’m not sure I’ll put all the cables and foot pedal in the side pockets – too heavy and bulky – but they will be handy for rulers, scissors, rotary cutter, markers, etc.

So, I’m ready for my next session now .

I have another, ‘spare’ machine which sits under a plastic cover and, while it probably isn’t going anywhere, it would look prettier in my workroom for having a fabric cover so next time a bit of spontaneous sewing time comes round I know what I’ll do. Does that mean I won’t be able to call it ‘spontaneous’ though?

If only it were so easy to fit a pair of trousers.

 

I’ll leave you with some ladies who have my share of ‘jelly’.

 

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54 Comments

Be More Squirrel (Edited to Contain Warning)

You may remember that last year my dogs ate the plums from our trees from the unripe to rotting stage and would do so all day long if allowed to.  The evenings were not pleasant.

Mr. T. decided that he would cut all twelve trees down as they are very old and the plums are not particularly nice anyway – well,  at least we didn’t think so.  The fig trees are also a doggy favourite but I couldn’t quite part with them so they are staying for the moment.

In future, all fruit trees will be planted on the other side of the fence that cordons off a part of the garden that the dogs haven’t got access to (apart from when they dig holes and get under the fence).

All three dogs have now discovered acorns so our walks are slowed down considerably by them snuffling around eating all the acorns they can find but, luckily, these do not seem to produce the gaseous emissions that plums do so I’m not overly worried about it although I must check they’re not toxic to dogs or anything.  (Update:  Yes, they are – please see note at the bottom of the post).  I truly believe my dogs will eat anything – the more disgusting the better.

I have also become a bit more squirrel this month and have reverted to my old habit of hoarding fabric.  I made a pair of trousers at long last and, flushed with success, placed an order for dressmaking fabric in the mistaken belief that I need more clothes or that Mlle. Tialys the Younger will be persuaded into dresses any time soon.  The trouble is, dresses are my favourite clothing item to make but I live in jeans and  so does Mlle. T.   What am I to do?  I think perhaps a solution might be to make more ‘tops’.  That way I can indulge myself with nice fabric and make pretty things but put jeans on underneath.  Of course, that might mean I’ll have to buy more patterns as most of mine are for dresses.

I have a clear cutting table at the moment while I await Mr. T’s return from the U.K. with my latest haul so I will make a second pair of trousers while I remember how to do it.

Meanwhile, I am making progress with the Eastern Jewels crochet blanket and have joined the first two rows together – only two more to go!  The more I do, the more I love it, the less I feel I will be able to part with it.

I took some time off from the crochet to knit up a couple of cotton dishcloths in my bid to cut down wasteful buying of kitchen towels, etc. but I’ve only managed two so far.  I’m going to try crochet ones next as they will probably be quicker.

Love the little ‘French tea-towel’ effect one.  You can find the patterns for both here and here.

  I’ve also been making waxed wraps in an attempt to cut down on single use plastic such as cling film but they are in use around cheese and the tops of bowls.  When I make some new ones – using beeswax this time instead of pure soy wax – I’ll show you some pics.

My fabric arrived from Laughing Hedgehog – don’t you just love the name – a company I hadn’t used before but they had the French General fabric I was looking for to back my Shabby Union Jack.

I was very lucky because I had ordered 1.5m which was being very optimistic but this was apparently the end of bolt so she kindly put all 1.8 m in for me which turned out to be just right.  I used the plain grey/brown for binding and, as you can see, decided to put a sleeve in just in case it ended up as a wall hanging rather than a throw.

Here it is as a throw

and here is the long, plain corridor – leading to the loo and Mlle. T. the Younger’s chamber of horrors  bedroom – where it might end up on the wall.

I think it needs a bit of something don’t you?

I’ll let you know where it ends up.

 

EDIT;

I did eventually Google the risks and found this amongst lots of other warnings –

Exposure to acorns in dogs is common in the autumn and winter months. The toxic ingredient is thought to be tannic acid, which can cause damage to the liver and kidneys. Signs include vomiting, diarrhoea (with or without blood), abdominal pain, inappetance and lethargy. Ingested acorns can also cause an intestinal blockage.

So, best not let your dog be more squirrel after all.

 

 

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56 Comments

A Flag for Friday

Probably four or five years ago I started a project and, after an enthusiastic start, I put it to one side, got involved with other things and that was that.  It was, however, still peeking at me in an accusatory fashion from underneath other things on the shelves of my cutting table so, in an effort to finish what I started I pulled it all out again.

I hadn’t done much – just the ‘brown’ triangles.

The project is a Moda bake shop ‘recipe’ by Lynne Goldsworthy (available here for free) and I liked the slightly raggedy look of the finished flag and the colours she used but, at that time, I’d never done much (if any) foundation paper piecing.  Now I have so it was a bit of a shock to remember that this is not at all like that apart from the fact that paper is involved.   In this method you cut up the fabric into squares using pinking shears (or cutter) and lay them on sheets of newspaper making sure they are overlapped by at least 1/4 inch.  In fact, the easiest way is to use charm packs which already have pinked edges.

Like so.

Then, you stitch down the pieces an 1/8 inch away from each pinked edge – which is why I wasn’t sure I wanted to continue with this project at first because it just seemed wrong to me.  However, this method is what gives it the shabby look that I had liked initially.

Zoom in for close up of top stitching along pinked edges

You separate the colours into brown, red and cream and lay each colour on sheets of newspaper which you cut to a set size then sew them down with a small stitch so, in effect, you are making a new fabric which is sort of what you do in all patchwork but this is different in that the seams are showing on top.  It feels a bit weird.    It is also a bit of a pain because, unless you use a multitude of pins, it does try to shift around under the sewing machine.  Then you remove the newspaper and cut the new ‘fabric’ into triangles for the brown fabric and different sized bands for the red and cream.

With me so far?

At this stage I was still dubious but, once I started joining it together I became more enthusiastic and am actually quite chuffed with the resulting top.

Oops! Forgot to clear those bedside tables off this time.

**** If you are not interested in more of ‘the process’ scroll down to the next set of ***** lest you be unnecessarily bored to tears.

I did find certain problems with the instructions so I did a bit of research to find out if anybody else had the same issues but couldn’t find anything so maybe it’s just me.  However, in case it helps, this is what I found.

When I joined the first quadrant together I assumed the joining seams would be 1/4 inch which is usual in patchwork.  Unfortunately, I assumed wrongly and it came out too small – luckily I checked before I joined the other three.  It seems that everything is 1/8 inch but I couldn’t find that instruction anywhere.  The top stitched seams are 1/8 inch, yes, but as they are not ‘normal’ seams I didn’t think it would follow that the joining seams would also be that small.  The instructions have you press the ‘normal’ seams open but I didn’t bother as that is a difficult thing to do with such a small seam allowance so I pressed to one side – a maverick, that’s me.  Also, because I had to undo the seams of the first quadrant and mess with edges cut on the bias after removal from the foundation paper, it started to go out of shape so I had to be careful lining it up with the other quadrants.

The instructions have you cut ten 2 inch bands from the cream ‘fabric’ you have made but, as you can see from the photo above, you actually need twelve.  Luckily I had enough cream squares left to cobble together another couple of bands.   The instructions also tell you to use 1 inch bands for this stage but she actually means 2 inch ones as there only four 1 inch bands in the design used for the narrow strips of the flag and, anyway, it is obvious from the photo that they should be the wider strips.  The pattern is free but, even so, I’m surprised it doesn’t appear to have been corrected since it was published as I’m sure I can’t be the only one – or can I??

Anyway, enough of the technical stuff.

****

Still with me?

This is actually supposed to be a wall hanging but I’m not sure Mr. T wants another one (yet) and I’m not so patriotic that I’m going to hang a Union Jack in a prominent position on the wall – even if it is a stylised, scruffy version.  So, I’m thinking I’ll use it as a throw over the back of a sofa or chair or bench or something.

The fabric I used is the same as the one in the original instructions and is a Moda fabric by French General and called ‘Falalalala’.  The text in the fabric range is taken from a French song of the same name which is sung to the same tune as ‘Deck the Halls’ but with different words so there’s a bit of entente cordiale going on here – as is fitting for a Brit living in France.  You can’t say I don’t give you useless information in my posts or even fodder for pub quizzes.  Of course, this range is hard to find now as I’d abandoned the project for so long but I wanted to back it with something pretty as it won’t be hidden on the wall but visible as the reverse side of a throw.  I found a couple of the designs still available in a shop in the U.K. – more in the U.S. of course but the shipping was silly talk – and I went for the cream one with poinsettias.  A rash choice for a house full of animals you might think but, hey, I’ve already got visible pinked edges in possible danger of fraying so I’m obviously throwing caution to the wind with this project.

Mr. Tialys will be arriving home from the U.K.  in a couple of hours with the cream fabric – and some of the plain greyish brown for the binding – I didn’t want the binding to be a feature as it’s supposed to be a flag after all – so I should be able to get it together this weekend.  I’m a little worried as the instructions say you need 2.5 yards of backing fabric and I worked out I’ll only need 1.6m – mixing my metrics with my imperials is never a good thing – so I might have to add a strip of some of the fabric I have left over, we’ll see but maths was never my strong point.  I will be quilting in the ditch only as I think there’s enough visible stitching going on already.

Hopefully, I’ll be able to show you the finished throw artfully draped over the back of a sofa and adorned with a cat or two (who will be chucked off straight after the photo is taken IG style)  early next week.

What do you think?  Have you ever had doubts about a project you started some time ago?  Did you abandon it or complete it and, if you completed it, were you glad or sorry that you bothered?

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More P.J.s – The Pears Pair

I showed you the muslin for the Kwik Sew pyjamas I made from the vintage sheet last time, now the real thing is finished.

I used some plain scrap fabric for the collar, cuffs and pocket top and some buttons I’d bought for something else at one time or another now lost in the mists of time and memory.

I bought the Liberty tana lawn on Ebay – 3m for 20 quid which was a bargain – somebody was having a de-stash which I might do one of these days (yeah, right!).  I’ve only used 1.5m for these so I have yet more Liberty tana lawn in my stash now.  I’m sure I’ll find a use for it eventually.  Maybe I could make the long bottoms for when there are visitors.

I’m sure you will be glad that I decided to let one of my old mannequins model them, rather than subject you to another view of my legs (even though it was a blurry photo).  I had to faff about with the shorts because of the pole and they’re still not hanging right but you get the idea.

I suspect flat buttons are the norm for pyjama tops but these go so well with the colours I had to use them even though they might dig in me when I’m asleep.  I don’t sleep on my front so I should be O.K. but, if not, I’ll change them for something more practical.  I don’t know how women  sleep on their fronts – don’t their lady bumps get in the way? It’s not supposed to be good for your back anyway so don’t do it although it is supposed to be good for preventing snoring so I might suggest it to Mr. T. who is a champion snorer and hasn’t got any lady bumps so there’s no excuse.  Anyway, I digress – note the double top stitching.  One line is just down the edge and I did that easily enough on the muslin but I chickened out of doing the second line which follows the line of the facing.  I didn’t want the bobbin thread on top so you sort of have to follow the line of the facing on the inside from the outside, if you know what I mean.  It’s the sort of tricksy finishing touch you do at the end that usually goes wrong for me and then I get upset because everything else went well and then I mess up at the last hurdle.  However – this time it worked.

Even though, in close up, they look like I’ve already slept in them (because I didn’t iron them again before taking the photos) I haven’t so I will report on the comfort factor after several sleeps.

Just to let you know –  my hand seems to have recovered quite nicely from the repetitive strain injury, arthritis, tendonitis or whatever else it was that was causing me pain.  I am still wearing my craft gloves though – when I remember – and have bought some more so that I have one up in my workroom for sewing and one downstairs for when I’m wrestling with wool.

Speaking of which, here’s my progress on the Eastern Jewels blanket.  I’m making the squares and triangles for each row and joining up as I go, as well as weaving in the endless ends, so it won’t be such a shock at the end.

The more I do the less I feel I will want to part with it.

Now I’ve finished the second pair of P.J.s I am tackling a quilting project I started a few years ago which I kept glimpsing, peeking at me accusingly from a corner of my workroom.  I’m not even sure whether I like it any more but the fabric was too expensive to discard so I’ll press on and see what happens.  I want to get quilting projects out of the way in preparation for the next block swap I’m participating in which will probably start in March/April this year.

What are you up to this weekend? Are you starting a new project or continuing with an existing one.  Or are you doing nothing whatsoever to do with crafting?  I’ll still be interested.  Honest!!

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45 Comments

Don’t Let The Bed Bugs Bite

Now my hatbox wallhanging is complete and in situ, I realised that my sewing mojo has returned – woohoo! – and so I thought I’d start with a pair of pyjamas and why not?

This is the pattern I used and this is a vintage sheet I unearthed from my ‘vintage sheet stash’  – hasn’t everybody got one of those?  I wanted to make a pair of these (the shorts version) for both myself and for Mlle Tialys the Younger but we are different sizes so I thought I’d trace off the size I thought she’d be and make a muslin we could both try  on and then go from there.  I’m trying to be good about tracing off patterns – especially those I might use more than once and for different people.

This is an easy make but it re-acquainted me with basic collars, cuffs, elastic casing, buttonholes and top stitching after the knitting and crochet fests that have been my crafting activities of choice lately – the wall hanging doesn’t count as I really only had the assembly to do.

I wasn’t going to do the contrast bits but I decided to go with it in the end and used some fabric sent to me by my Susanna over at Pins, Needles and Threads who was my sewing Stitching Santa for Christmas 2015 (was it really that long ago?).  I think it makes a difference.

The shorts have an elasticated back and then you make ties from the fabric which are joined to the elastic at the sides and emerge through buttonholes on the front so very adjustable and handy if you decide you want to make room for a midnight feast.   I had lots of fun turning a narrow tube of fabric the right way out again – I might use ribbon next time!

I did all the seams on my overlocker which is very underused at the moment and, considering I paid a small fortune for it, deserves to be used much more and for more varied tasks than it is now.  I need to get online and do some ‘different ways of using your hideously expensive overlocker that you are currently only using to do stuff you could do on a very basic one’ tutorials.  Anybody know of any good ones 🙂

Mlle Tialys wouldn’t pose in her P.J.s but I’m not so proud – at least the photo is relatively blurry and you can only just make out the unmade bed behind me 😮

This is a very wearable muslin for Mlle T and has shown me that, when I make mine, I need to go down one size for the top and two for the bottom (as I no longer have one 😦 )

It’s sometimes a nuisance that dress forms only have one leg but you get the idea.

You may remember that I bought some rather striking Liberty tana lawn with which to make my p.j.s.

This was the seller’s photo I showed you before and the pears looked enormous.

However, when it eventually arrived in France in Mr. T’s cabin bag, they were a much more discreet size as I have tried to show by artfully placing a spool of cotton on top.

So I’ll get on with them while the mood is upon me but I might have another rummage through my vintage sheets too – I need the space.

Have you ever used vintage sheets to make anything wearable?

 

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