Darth – A Life in Feathers

I have known Darth since he was an egg

Egss in Fabric Basket

Back in 2006, 0ur four black hens went broody all at the same time and a neighbour gave us four fertile eggs for them to sit on.  Only two hatched and the proud parents got off the nest to make sure their little peeping yellow puff balls were eating and keeping safe.

Hen Chicks

At this stage we had no idea if they were male or female and, by the time it was obvious that one of them was a male, we didn’t want to to do anything about it.

So, the hens got a cockerel and so did we – and so did the neighbours.

Cockerel in his Prime

Here he is in his prime.

Darth with Mum (one of them)

He had various hens passing through his harem and one of his original mothers is still alive.  I suppose at one time his mothers became his lovers – fowl I know but that’s the way they roll in the chicken run.

He spent the next ten years or so making a lot of noise and probably upsetting quite a few people although they never said so – or not in so many words.

He survived several new dogs arriving who were not ‘chicken friendly’ at first and there was plenty of wishful thinking going on.

german shepherd with rubber chicken.

Regular readers will know he’s had a few problems lately including scabby legs, overgrown spurs (who remembers the hot potato treatment?)  and wobbly spells but a ten year old cockerel is pretty unusual I think.

Saturday before last he slipped off this mortal perch and is hopefully now roosting on a higher one with the lovely smooth(ish) legs of his youth.

Rooster

Darth Incubator

2006 – 2016

(Because even chickens deserve an obituary)

 

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What I’m Doing Instead of Zumba this Saturday Morning

**Warning: Heavy with craft photos and dog related text but all for a good cause.

This is Taz my ‘who knows what mixture of breeds?’ dog – we have had him since he was a pup.

Elderly Dog

He’s getting on now and, at eleven years old, he’s going grey, losing his hair and getting a bit grumpy.  Just like a lot of  humans really.  Much as I love him, he is a bit of a pain in his dotage.  He spends his days foraging for food, grumbling at the cats, lying across the kitchen floor in front of the fridge/cooker/cupboard/wherever you need to get to and bumping into things as his sight is going.  He spends his evenings sleeping, snoring and ‘scenting’ the air with the gaseous results of his aforementioned foraging and his nights wandering the corridor and aimlessly scraping at doors before sinking into a deep sleep.

I can only imagine then, what it must be like to care for 30 old dogs in your own home.  I don’t think I could do it but, luckily, there are people that can.  Mike and Leeanne came to France from the U.K. and have somehow found themselves dedicated to the care and comfort of elderly and disabled dogs by starting the Twilight Retirement Home for Dogs or, as we are in France, Twilight Maison de Retraite pour les chiens you can read all about them here .

Twilight Maison de Retraite

This Saturday we are holding a fundraising event for Twilight and, although I don’t do craft fairs as a rule, I’m going along with some of my wares to see if we can’t help with the food, extensive vet bills and general running costs of caring for so many ‘retired’ dogs all in one place that Mike and Leanne face.

Of course, I will have my dog collars for sale….

Hand Made Dog Collars for Fundraising

Some dog bandanas……

Dog Bandanas for Fundraising

some simple tote bags (who let the cats in?)……..

Simple Tote Bags for Fundraising

some more cats disguised as angels……

Scented Cat Hanging Decs

a couple of knitted dog coats…….

Knitted Dog Coats

a few key fobs made with the leftover dog collar materials……

Key Fobs for Fundraising

the results of my recent foray into needlecases……

Quilted Needlecases

some mini poufs that have been taking up space in my workroom for a little while…….

Hexagon Cushions

likewise some doorstops……

Fabric Doorstops

four or five padded message boards……

Padded Noticeboards

a set of coasters…..

Reindeer Coasters

a rather fetching linen handbag I made which has Eiffel Towers on the lining fabric – très chic …..

Linen Purse

and a partridge in a pear tree an owl with a Christmas tree

Bookend

I just hope there will be people looking to buy some stocking fillers and I don’t come home with all of it .  I usually do my part by buying home made cakes (especially the ginger cake and Christmas pudding as they aren’t easy to come by here and Debbie makes some scrummy ones),  the bottle tombola (the bottles are generally full of something alcoholic) , some second hand books and whatever else takes my fancy.

I can always go and fling myself around in Zumba next Saturday but I’ll leave the last words to Mike and Leeanne to explain how Twilight came about.

*****************

We started Twilight in the summer of 2009, in memory of losing our Kizzy, and needing to find a friend for our elderly but happy retriever, Teg.
It became evident, searching the pounds and refuges, that if you were an old
dog, life was not always so good, and your ending might be premature and/or without dignity.
So now we offer limited places for elderly dogs who are lost, abandoned or bereaved of their owners.

We are not a formal refuge, just mere volunteers with the time, space and love to share our calm home with the dogs ?en famille?. Twilight, La Maison de Retraite pour Les Chiens, the old doggies home.

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Snow? It Must Be Time To Get Out The Knitting.

The first snow has appeared on the mountains opposite our house.  Despite taking this from my bedroom window on the top floor, I couldn’t omit the wires but there you go – that’s the reality, I won’t whitewash it.  I could have gone out in the back garden and taken it I suppose but I happened to be in the bedroom when the photography mood came upon me.

First Snow on Pyrenees

Anyway, with the snow my knitting mojo comes back into play although this embryonic lacy scarf doesn’t look as if it would keep anybody particularly warm but I had a 25g ball of Rowan Kidsilk Haze left over from the boyfriend cardigan I made last year and Sheila at Sewchet made some beautiful scarves with this pattern last year so I was inspired.  I’ve never knitted lace before and I found the first few rows a little difficult – I kept losing count of the stitches because the yarn is so fine  – but once the pattern started to establish itself I was away.  I didn’t thread beads on to the first row as the pattern (available here for free) has you do because I’m not sure the intended recipient is a ‘beady’ person and also, that might have been a step too far for my tolerance with ‘fiddly’.

Lace Knitting

What bothers me a little is how this scarf is going to grow long enough to go round somebody’s neck.  I appear to have used about a third of the 25g ball already and it’s supposed to end up around 53inches (135cm) long and the bit above is only about 8 inches so I can’t see that happening.  Does a miracle happen at the blocking stage?

Unlike with sewing, I don’t normally have two knitting projects on the go at once but, as the lace will be a gift, I had to make a start on it and I had already begun a second Drew (boyfriend cardigan) in a different colourway as I already had half the yarn I needed to make another one.  As you can see below, the fine Kidsilk Haze is knitted together with Rowan Kid Classic so is much easier to handle than the skinny one on its own.

Kim Hargreaves Drew Cardigan no.2

Last year I knit a jumper while my Mum was visiting because she knits and we can have some mother daughter bonding time over the needles.  I sort of knew I wasn’t going to like it much so, once finished, it languished in my ‘I Like Big Balls and I Cannot Lie’ knitting bag all summer waiting to be sewn up.

Marble Chunky Jumper

The sleeves were supposed to be holey too but I didn’t do that for a reason I now can’t remember but I’m glad anyway.

It’s O.K. but I don’t love it.

What I do like is the shape – it’s quite hard to find a knitting pattern that is fitted and has a nice scoop neck.

The yarn – and pattern – is from James C. Brett and it’s called Marble Chunky, in case you’re interested.

Marble Chunky Jumper Back VIew

I like the variegated colour and, if I were to knit it again, which I won’t, but if I did, I would omit the holes from the front too.

As with the vast majority of my knitted garments, I will probably only wear this ‘around the house’ as, although I love to knit, I’m not a big knitwear wearer.  Bizarre I know.

It’s always good to end with a cat (or dog) photo in my opinion so here is one of Mac who climbed into my antique bowl while I was trying to photograph it for my shop. (It is a very big bowl)

Cat in Antique French Confit Bowl

I was going to use it as a product photo but thought it might put people off who are allergic to cats but it was too cute to waste so I’m sharing it with you instead.

 

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A Manly Project

When Mr. T’s birthday pressie didn’t look as if it would arrive on time – it was coming from China – I was panicking to think of something I could give him so that he didn’t have to  look all stoically brave yet secretly upset that he didn’t have anything to open apart from his birthday card.

I’ve mentioned before that he has embarked on making leather goods – mainly handbags (hoorah!) – so he does need a certain amount of sewing equipment including needles and, being a bloke (and an untidy one at that) he tends to scatter his haberdashery items around the table top in the shed.  I love any excuse to use the word ‘haberdashery’ it’s one of my favourite words – the French word for it is ‘mercerie’ which doesn’t sound nearly so exciting.

Anyway, I decided to make him a needlecase so that he can keep all his leatherworking needles in one place and off the floor where our dogs could step on them on their way through the shed into the garden as, unlike us, they don’t wear slippers in the house.

Quilted Needlecase

 

I used all scraps for this so, conveniently, it allows me to link to Kate’s Scrappy Happy day this month.

Quilted Needlecase Inside

I didn’t give him my stork scissors – they are in their just for photographic purposes but I haven’t seen my seam ripper for a while and, I don’t know about you, but I can’t survive long without mine.

His present did turn up on the day in the end so he got a bonus and all feet and paws will be safer.

While I was at it, I made another one which will be a stocking filler for Mlle. Tialys the elder – she says she reads my blog but seems suspiciously ignorant of anything I put on it so I think the secret is safe:/

Forest Themed Needlecase

I can’t really claim this one as a scrap project as the cover fabric was new but the rest is from the scrap bin.

Inside Needlecase

 Finally I’ve found a use for the Kam snaps I seem to have a stock of too.

Did I say ‘stocking filler’?  That brings me to the subject of Christmas and as it’s such a miserable Monday – weather wise and world news wise – I thought I’d cheer you up by giving you the links to the annual battle of the ads designed to win your hearts at this time of year between Sainsbury’s and John Lewis.  If you’re in the U.K. you might already have seen them.  Manipulatively sentimental, of course, but both beautifully done.  I bet you can guess which one is my favourite.

 

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Adventures with the Rosa Shirtdress Part 2

You may remember my wrangles (in Part 1) during my Rosa Shirtdress making experience with the fabric formerly known as black corduroy  (now called something totally different, by me at least) .   If you missed it, and care,  it’s here.

The line drawing for Tilly and the Buttons Rosa Shirt/Shirtdress shows lots of the features I wanted to try out or improve upon and I knew some of them would be a challenge after a long time worshipping at the altars of the knit fabric and overlocker gods which is why I opted to purchase the online workshop along with the pattern.

Rosa Shirtdress Line Drawing

See the princess seams, the forward shoulder seams, the pointed back yoke, the separate collar stand, the curved hem and rolled cuffs with tabs.  Note the multitudinous buttons.  These features along with mock felled seams, optional contrast fabric in the collar and button stands made me really want to give this a serious go.  I know there are patch pockets but I have enough going on in the chest department without pointing it out so left those off.  I made the shirt version as it’s the same as the dress only shorter and this was really just to try out the fit.

I showed off my collar in part 1 but I’m proud of it so here it is again (even though it looks as if one side is slightly shorter than the other – which it isn’t)

Rosa Shirt Top Button and Collar

Here is an inside view of my mock felled seams and contrast button and collar stands.

Mock Felled Seams

Please ignore the slightly raggedy edges of the serged seam – that was BB (before Babylock) and just as my old overlocker was giving out.

Here is the rolled cuff with button tab.

Rosa Shirt Cuffs & Tabs

Tilly & the Buttons has now released a bonus addition to the pattern for full length sleeves and standard cuffs which I might do next time I make this.

In this fetching back view you can see the pointed yoke  which went perfectly the first time round but, when I had to undo it because there were holes in my charity shop fabric, I didn’t get it as precise the second time.  I steamed the hell out of it which served to flatten the dreaded cord a bit but hey ho, it’s supposed to be a toile.

Rosa Shirt Back View Toile

Probably my favourite bit is the curved hem at the back which has a look of a peplum about it from the side.

Rosa Shirt Side View

Here I am with one of my better behaved dogs.

And here is my doppleganger mannequin showing the complete article.

Rosa Shirt Wearable Toile on Mannequin

How come her waist looks smaller than mine and yet she is me?

When I make it again I need to take an inch off the shoulder width for me and make the dress in the next size up for my daughter to accommodate her bottom – something I sadly don’t appear to have much of any more.

The struggle I had with the buttonholes is almost too painful to repeat but it was, again, to do with the fabric.  Being thick in itself and having interfacing and a contrast fabric on the back my Janome’s one step buttonhole feature was having none of it.  Luckily I started (and screwed up multiple times) with those tabs on the cuffs so they were easy to re-cut and re-try.  In the end though, I excavated my old Singer machine which has a four-step buttonhole and managed to do all the buttons using that.  Next time it will be easier.

As always with a Tilly and the Buttons pattern it is presented on strong paper with dark lines and easily visible markings so a dream to trace if that’s what you like to do.  It is well written in a neat little booklet with photographs which would have been perfectly sufficient for me in truth although the online workshop contains some very useful tips.  Tilly’s presentation style is very friendly and down to earth and she has the sort of speaking voice I can listen to easily – and if you watch many YouTube videos, you will know how important that is.  My only criticism of the online workshop would be that some of the straightforward sewing tasks performed could probably have been edited to make them shorter.  My plan of – I’ve paid for it so I’m damn well going to do it – definitely paid off though and now I feel more confident in tackling patterns with a little more detail in than I previously would have chosen.

Now, bring on the zip insertions.

Do you find you need to take a step back, slow down and regroup every now and again in your sewing, knitting, painting or whatever?  How do you get back on track?  Or do you find your progression is constant and you just keep getting better and better, never making any mistakes? – in which case don’t tell me as I will probably hate you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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What’s In The Box Flo?

 

I don’t know who was more excited today – me or the dog.

Dog on BOx

Of course, she was only interested in the cardboard box but this was inside

Babylock Imagine

My new baby.

With jet air threading and no fiddling with tension, I won’t know I’m born.

Can’t wait to run up a wrap dress or two.

I could have ordered it here in France but I wanted to use my U.K. bank account to pay for it and I have used this company in the U.K. several times before and have always found them to offer an excellent service.  Plus, it was free delivery even to France.

Look at all the free goodies I got too.

Free Stuff with Overlocker

There’s a blind hem foot, an elastic foot and a beading foot and even though I’ve never felt the need to put beads on a garment before, you just never know.  Bless them, they even included an adaptor plug as I’m in foreign parts.

I’m a little worried about this though.

Easy threading instructions

It brings to mind the card in the back of the seat in front on aircraft that you have to look at but it scares the life out of you when you do.  I always cringe when they say ‘when you hear the words ‘brace, brace’, ‘ and fervently hope that I never do.

I haven’t had a play yet because I want at least a clear afternoon when I can closet myself away with my new baby so that we can bond.

I’ll let you know how we get on.

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Adventures with the Rosa Shirtdress Part 1 (or Cord? Oh Gawd!)

Paper Pieced Star

I have been very remiss with my dressmaking endeavours over the last couple of years.  I have taken to knit fabrics mainly due to the fact that there is no need for buttons or zips and I can whizz through those seams with my overlocker like a dervish.  I would say I have no patience but, with other projects (see above for instance), I show that I do so it’s not that.  Partly, I think it’s because I have far too many clothes already and don’t need any more – although that doesn’t stop me when I’m in Zara  – one of my daughters is now making her own clothes and the other isn’t overly interested in clothes per se.

So, when Tilly and the Buttons released the new Rosa shirtdress pattern with a separate online workshop I thought it would be an opportunity for me to go back to basics, take it slowly and try to produce something to be proud of again.  This was a leap for me as I usually try to avoid anything with buttonholes and this has 12 of them.  The pattern also has button stands, a separate collar stand, mock felled seams and a pointed yoke at the back  – none of which I had tackled before.  I figured that if I paid money for a workshop it would force me to sit still and concentrate.

Tilly & the Buttons Rosa Shirt Dress

I originally intended to make the dress for my daughter who, at 21, already appears far too old for it judging by the lovely model on the pattern who is surely about 14 years old.  Despite this, I thought it would be a versatile enough garment for both her and me.  I know, from past makes with Tilly patterns that I am a size 3 or 4 – which doesn’t mean I am a 15 year old eastern European catwalk model – only that Tilly’s sizes are numbered differently.  I’ve never made anything in the range for Mlle. Tialys the younger however so thought I’d first make a toile.  Not being a lover of ‘wasting time’ I thought I’d make a size 4 toile in a stash fabric and we could both try it on and, like Cinderella, whoever it fit would have the handsome prince  shirtdress.

To save fabric, I thought I’d make the shirt rather than the dress and I used a black needlecord fabric I’d found in the local charity shop some time before.  I made the toile – which fit me like the proverbial glove – and made a good job of the pointed yoke until I realised – holding it up to admire my handiwork – that you could see daylight through the fabric.  On closer inspection, the needlecord had some wear and tear in certain areas and, unfortunately, it was one of those areas that I had used for the yoke construction.  It had to be redone and, as so often happens, I couldn’t quite get it as good as the first time.

Cord Dust

Meanwhile, the cutting of the cord – so to speak – had resulted in a black dust that had settled over every single surface in my workroom.  It was under my fingernails and on my skin – in the evening when I used a cleanser on my face, the resulting cotton pad gave me a shock until I remembered I hadn’t been toiling up chimney stacks like a female version of Bert in Mary Poppins (although more authentically cockney) but just chancing my arm with black corduroy in my workroom.

So, I re-cut another toile in a cloud of black fibres and it was at this stage, laying the pattern pieces on for a second time, I forgot about ‘nap’ which has resulted in a couple of variations in the shade of black which may or may not be noticeable enough to bother me although Mr. Tialys picked me up on it straight away as men tend to do.

Serging up the unfinished edges was a trial as my overlocker – a Pfaff model bought cheaply in Lidl three years ago so that I could see if I would actually use one or not – is on it’s last knockings.  It chews up the edge instead of slicing through it neatly, one of the needle threads keeps coming unthreaded and little ‘nests’ of thread keep forming under the foot which all inevitably lead to the dreaded ‘overlocker re-threading nightmare’ which generally has me running screaming to the wine rack instead of just casually walking over to it as I usually do.

(New overlocker now on order – with jet air threading – hoorah!)

The only good thing I have to say about the cord fabric is that there is a lot of topstitching involved with this pattern and, as I opted not to use a contrasting thread, any less than perfect stitches are neatly hidden in the pile of the fabric.  My next version will be in chambray so there’ll be no place to hide.

The option of a contrasting inside collar stand and button stand makes for a nice feature which is mostly hidden but I know it’s there and it makes me feel good.  Having said that, I don’t think I’ve done up  a top button on any piece of clothing since I’ve been able to do buttons up by myself.

I’ve half throttled my mannequin – who feels no pain – in order to prove that I can do it if I want to though.

Rosa Shirt Top Button and Collar

(some sort of optical illusion is going on here as both sides of the collar are definitely the same length in ‘real life’)

Here’s how it will more often be worn

Rosa Shirt/Shirtdress CollarDetail

Of course, having shed its fibres in every possible nook and cranny while being constructed, the dreaded cord is now attracting every microscopic piece of fluff, thread, hair and dust and displaying it proudly to the world.  Have I said ‘never again’?

I didn’t take any photos as I went along – too busy concentrating and anyway I probably would have got cord dust in my camera lens.

More on the pattern and a full size ‘reveal’ in Part Two.

By the way, the top patchwork block was one of the three I sent to Kate for our F2F block swap and I can’t resist showing you this one which is from the Elizabeth Hartman Fancy Forest quilt pattern.

Fancy Fox Block

Have you ever had cause to pledge never to use a certain fabric, yarn or other craft accoutrement ever again?

 

 

 

 


 

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Sore Paw

For any of you who sent good wishes for Stan and his dodgy foot – I’m afraid it didn’t clear up with the anti-inflammatory tablets so, this morning., the vet removed it.  The cyst, not the foot.

collar of shameHe’s not a happy chap.

It appears to have been an interdigital cyst or furuncle(!) which means she had to mess with the webbing between his toes and try to stitch it back up again without joining two toes together – at least I think that’s what she said.  Now I know what it is I have been doing some research online and it appears that some consider surgery to be a last resort – rather than a second one – or even not something to be considered at all and some say that the cyst can come back again. So now I’m worried that I shouldn’t have just taken the vet’s word for it and, instead,  bathed it with an athlete’s foot solution or Epsom Salts or even changed his diet as some people claim they have had success with.  Sometimes the Internet is a double edged sword  :(

Still, what’s done is done and I will change the dressing after 3 days, keep giving him the antibiotics and the vet will look at it again after a week.  The offending item has been sent off for analysis so let’s hope there is no bad news from that.

In the meantime, I have to contend with a demented, animated lampshade that is desperate to run about on 3 feet, play ball and forage for fallen figs as he did before the cone of shame was fitted.    The cats are terrified of him in his new guise.

Please keep all those fingers and paws crossed for the time being and I’ll keep you updated.

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Can I Mention the S Word?

It’s October now – so can I say ‘Santa’?

Do you have lots of friends and family who understand just what a sewing/knitting/crochet addict wants for Christmas?  If you have, you’re lucky.  I find it difficult to make a wish list for my family unless it’s very specific and then that spoils the surprise.

For the third year running,  Sheila who blogs over at Sewchet, has the answer.

secret-santa

She is organising Stitching Santa again .

In a Christmas nutshell :-

Sheila will partner you with somebody in your category –  you can participate in the one for Knitting/Crochet or the one for Sewing – or you can enter both.  I am!

If you don’t already follow that person’s blog, it is a good idea to ‘blog stalk’ them to get an idea of their likes and dislikes and their taste in general.

You send a parcel containing a gift costing no more than £10 (other currencies shown over at Sheila’s blog) and anything else you think your recipient would like such as little handmade gifts, accessories, notions, etc.

You will receive a parcel in return (woohoo!) which you should put under the tree until Christmas morning even though you might be tempted to squeeze and manhandle it a little

You can enter from anywhere in the World and Sheila will try to match you up so the shipping costs aren’t too bad.

For full details and to register, go over and register on Sheila’s Stitching Santa page here

I entered last year and it was great fun to choose gifts to include in the parcels and to have pressies under the tree that I knew would be themed especially for me and my sewing and knitting habits.

Sorry, I think I put the ‘C’ word in there somewhere as well but there’s only about 84 sleeps left.

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Fabric Confusion, A Dog Paw and Yellow Coconut

For all of you that were concerned about the nasty thing on Stan’s paw I’m pleased to say that it appears to have shrunk to nothing after his course of anti-inflammatory tablets.  I will keep an eye on it but, for the moment,  he is back to normal which means he is constantly worrying the life out of me to throw a ball for him

diva-ball-junkie

To celebrate I spent some rare moments making sweet things.  I could probably hold the Bake Off in my kitchen with the amount of equipment we have despite the fact we are not really big dessert/pudding/cake eaters – although Mr. Tialys can put a whole McVities Digestive biscuit in his mouth at once – and does – sometimes until the biscuit tin is empty.  Anyway I made these Coconut, Cherry, Chocolate Fingers and very nice they are were too.

cherrycoconutfingers

In the photograph accompanying the recipe I made these from (which you can find below if interested), the coconut part was very white but our ‘home grown’ eggs make everything we use them in turn very, very yellow so that’s why mine don’t look the same.  That, and the fact that I haven’t cut mine into delicate fingers but rather little slabs.

When you see some interesting looking fabric that says 110cm wide x 2.8m long for 4 euros you just have to go for it even if there’s a sign saying you’re not allowed to unroll it.  One of our rare charity shops has lots of such rolls and I suppose, if you ask one of the volunteers to have a better look, they would let you but I like surprises.

Mystery Fabric

It had a sort of Liberty look about it.  Anyway this is the fabric unrolled.

Panel Fabric

The panels run down the length of the fabric.

Panel Fabric

So this is it turned on its side.

It’s pretty but what could I make with it?  I don’t know what the fabric is but it has a very nice drape to it.  The only thing I can think of is a summery maxi dress for next year (or a midi dress as I’m short but not that short) or a maxi skirt also for next summer.  Anybody have any other ideas?  Have you had any experience with this sort of panelled fabric?  They must have a purpose in mind when they manufacture it mustn’t they?

Out of interest, I did a burn test on the fabric to see if I could tell what it was.  I do like an experiment especially if it involves flame but, typically, my results were inconclusive as it seemed not to fit any of the categories given in the burn test list you can find here.  This burnt brightly with a yellow flame and didn’t melt or smell icky but it didn’t leave a soft grey ash.  It left a black residue but it crushed easily so wasn’t a ‘bead’.  I think it must be a blend but there is definitely something natural in there.

Stan is very grateful for you all keeping your fingers and paws crossed for him and would like to invite you for a game of ball any time you have a few hours to spare.

ball-junkie

Be warned, I got tendonitis!!

Coconut, Cherry & Chocolate Fingers

(makes 16)

200g dessicated coconut

85g caster sugar

150g dark chocolate chips

85g glacé cherries, halved

2 eggs, beaten

150g dark chocolate, broken into pieces

Combine the coconut, sugar, choc chips and cherries in a bowl until evenly distributed then mix in the

eggs to make a gooey paste.  Spoon the mixture into a 30cm x 20cm brownie tin that you’ve lined with baking

parchment and spread evenly with a wooden spoon, packing it down firmly.  Bake for 20 minutes at 180°C/Gas 4

until golden brown and set. Melt the chocolate pieces carefully

(in a bowl over hot water or watched like a hawk in 20 second bursts in the microwasve is best)

and pour over the top of baked mixture spreading evenly

over the top.  Leave to cool in tin, cut into fingers with a sharp knife and refrigerate until well set.

Eat.

(Taken from Sesame & Spice by Anne Shooter)

 

 

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