Posts Tagged black corduroy fabric

Cutting the Mustard

I’ve been busy behind the patchwork block and crocheted blanket scenes with a bit of dressmaking.

I think I showed you my cutting table laid out with some goldy mustard coloured viscosey crepey fabric  – stop me if I’m getting too technical.  I bought it several years ago and meant to make something with it last autumn when the colour was ‘in’ but luckily, a year later, it still seems to be ‘in’.  Not that I particularly care if it’s ‘in’ or ‘out’ but I think it’s a good, autumn colour in any case and I might as well move it out of my stash while the stars are aligned.

I recently bought this ‘Libby Shirt’ pattern from Sew Over It which I thought would  work well with this drapey fabric.   I usually wear very fitted tops so this boxy shape is a bit of a departure for me but I have identified a gap in my wardrobe for looser fitting blouses.  (Mr. Tialys laughed like a drain at the thought I might have a ‘gap’ in my wardrobe because, as far as he can tell, there’s no space in there at all). 

I liked the options of having a cropped straight front with slightly longer back or being able to lengthen and slightly curve the front and, in this instance, I went for the latter option. The sleeves are ‘grown on’ so no fiddling about needed there although the cuffs are added separately.  The collar is notched and is a partial stand collar and I really like the look of it though,  I must confess, the construction was a bit ‘odd’ and I think I had more trouble with it than I had constructing a ‘full’ stand collar in a previous project.  However, I have since made a skirt and cut out a different top so the reasons why I found it fiddly are now lost and therefore this observation will be of no help to anybody – sorry!  I would say that Lisa of Sew Over It has produced a tutorial to explain the construction of the collar more thoroughly and the additional photographs and more detailed instructions online definitely helped which is good because I will probably make at least one more for next Summer as I have quite a bit of Liberty tana lawn in my stash which would work very nicely with this pattern.

My ‘me’ mannequin (in that it is adjusted to my measurements)  is good for displaying the features.  I didn’t have the exact same colour of mustard buttons in my stash and couldn’t find any in the shop so went for these lighter ones which I think lifts the expanse of solid mustard a bit.  I can always change them later if I spot the perfect ones somewhere, though we all know that’s not going to happen and I’ll never get round to removing the ones I’ve already sewn on.  Let’s be honest.

A nice feature on the back of the blouse is the slightly gathered yoke and curved hem.

An action shot – or at least that’s what Stan is hoping it will be once I stop posing, pick the ball up and start playing with him.

Not sure whether Mlle. Tialys the Younger is holding the camera at an angle or the tree is doing a leaning tower of Pisa impersonation but it does appear as if I’m trying to stop it from falling over which might explain my slightly pained expression.

Next up – in the dressmaking category – will be my second attempt at working with corduroy (also ‘in’ this autumn – nobody can say I don’t try to keep up) and, if you remember my previous encounter with said fabric here – an extract from which below –  you may wonder why.

Meanwhile, the cutting of the cord – so to speak – had resulted in a black dust that had settled over every single surface in my workroom.  It was under my fingernails and on my skin – in the evening when I used a cleanser on my face, the resulting cotton pad gave me a shock until I remembered I hadn’t been toiling up chimney stacks like a female version of Bert in Mary Poppins (although more authentically cockney) but just chancing my arm with black corduroy in my workroom.

So, I re-cut another toile in a cloud of black fibres and it was at this stage, laying the pattern pieces on for a second time, I forgot about ‘nap’ which has resulted in a couple of variations in the shade of black which may or may not be noticeable enough to bother me although Mr. Tialys picked me up on it straight away as men tend to do.

Though it worked out well enough in the end.

 

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Adventures with the Rosa Shirtdress Part 2

You may remember my wrangles (in Part 1) during my Rosa Shirtdress making experience with the fabric formerly known as black corduroy  (now called something totally different, by me at least) .   If you missed it, and care,  it’s here.

The line drawing for Tilly and the Buttons Rosa Shirt/Shirtdress shows lots of the features I wanted to try out or improve upon and I knew some of them would be a challenge after a long time worshipping at the altars of the knit fabric and overlocker gods which is why I opted to purchase the online workshop along with the pattern.

Rosa Shirtdress Line Drawing

See the princess seams, the forward shoulder seams, the pointed back yoke, the separate collar stand, the curved hem and rolled cuffs with tabs.  Note the multitudinous buttons.  These features along with mock felled seams, optional contrast fabric in the collar and button stands made me really want to give this a serious go.  I know there are patch pockets but I have enough going on in the chest department without pointing it out so left those off.  I made the shirt version as it’s the same as the dress only shorter and this was really just to try out the fit.

I showed off my collar in part 1 but I’m proud of it so here it is again (even though it looks as if one side is slightly shorter than the other – which it isn’t)

Rosa Shirt Top Button and Collar

Here is an inside view of my mock felled seams and contrast button and collar stands.

Mock Felled Seams

Please ignore the slightly raggedy edges of the serged seam – that was BB (before Babylock) and just as my old overlocker was giving out.

Here is the rolled cuff with button tab.

Rosa Shirt Cuffs & Tabs

Tilly & the Buttons has now released a bonus addition to the pattern for full length sleeves and standard cuffs which I might do next time I make this.

In this fetching back view you can see the pointed yoke  which went perfectly the first time round but, when I had to undo it because there were holes in my charity shop fabric, I didn’t get it as precise the second time.  I steamed the hell out of it which served to flatten the dreaded cord a bit but hey ho, it’s supposed to be a toile.

Rosa Shirt Back View Toile

Probably my favourite bit is the curved hem at the back which has a look of a peplum about it from the side.

Rosa Shirt Side View

Here I am with one of my better behaved dogs.

And here is my doppleganger mannequin showing the complete article.

Rosa Shirt Wearable Toile on Mannequin

How come her waist looks smaller than mine and yet she is me?

When I make it again I need to take an inch off the shoulder width for me and make the dress in the next size up for my daughter to accommodate her bottom – something I sadly don’t appear to have much of any more.

The struggle I had with the buttonholes is almost too painful to repeat but it was, again, to do with the fabric.  Being thick in itself and having interfacing and a contrast fabric on the back my Janome’s one step buttonhole feature was having none of it.  Luckily I started (and screwed up multiple times) with those tabs on the cuffs so they were easy to re-cut and re-try.  In the end though, I excavated my old Singer machine which has a four-step buttonhole and managed to do all the buttons using that.  Next time it will be easier.

As always with a Tilly and the Buttons pattern it is presented on strong paper with dark lines and easily visible markings so a dream to trace if that’s what you like to do.  It is well written in a neat little booklet with photographs which would have been perfectly sufficient for me in truth although the online workshop contains some very useful tips.  Tilly’s presentation style is very friendly and down to earth and she has the sort of speaking voice I can listen to easily – and if you watch many YouTube videos, you will know how important that is.  My only criticism of the online workshop would be that some of the straightforward sewing tasks performed could probably have been edited to make them shorter.  My plan of – I’ve paid for it so I’m damn well going to do it – definitely paid off though and now I feel more confident in tackling patterns with a little more detail in than I previously would have chosen.

Now, bring on the zip insertions.

Do you find you need to take a step back, slow down and regroup every now and again in your sewing, knitting, painting or whatever?  How do you get back on track?  Or do you find your progression is constant and you just keep getting better and better, never making any mistakes? – in which case don’t tell me as I will probably hate you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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