Posts Tagged colette patterns

It’s Nippy! Must Be Knitting Time.

It’s that time of year when I prefer the comfort of a big, warm, fluffy ball of wool and a pair of chunky needles to a cutting mat and some flimsy fabric.  That’s not to say I have abandoned the sewing machine.  I have the new Grainline sweatshirt pattern, ‘Linden’  and some french terry fabric ready to make something to keep me warm at the start of my yoga class.  I also have Colette’s new Dahlia dress pattern for which I’m going to throw caution to the wind and try sewing with plaid again – they promise it’s an ideal pattern for plaid (no darts) and will hold my hand along the way which I will need after my last disastrous attempt.   So I’m just awaiting a huge fabric delivery, praying Customs won’t punish me too much for ordering from the States,  then I can get going on that.  I also have a sort of 70s boho vibe top cut out and ready to go for Mlle Tialys the younger and just need to make or buy some bias binding and ribbon and I’ll be off.  But, for the moment, I’m mainly in knitting mode.

In a timely fashion for the temperature change we’ve just experienced – one day in swimming pool*, next day looking at snow on the mountains – I’ve just recently finished this jacket or short coat, as it is called on the pattern.

* not me in swimming pool of course.  As if.  It needs to be at least 27 degrees for me to get in – and I’m talking water temperature not air temperature

Square Patterned Jacket

This is Sirdar Pattern 8951 in Denim Ultra which is a joy to work with and also knits up quicker than you can say ‘I think I might actually wear this one’.  My mum had made one for herself and I liked it, especially when I saw the size of the needles (10mm) and the rope like yarn.  It’s definitely a quick fix knit.  I was lucky enough to find somebody selling it for a fraction of the price but only in one colour – Laurel – which is a dark green with black fleck, although I know it looks grey in the photo.  So an economical knit too.

Here is the back but I confess that, true to form, I made an error right at the beginning by ignoring my usual insistence using cable cast on and following the pattern instructions to cast on using the thumb method.  I’m sure there is a good reason to do this but, not being used to it, I cast on too loosely for the back and it stayed a bit ‘loopy’.  When I took these photos I hadn’t fixed it but now I have by weaving a length of yarn along the cast on edge at the back to neaten it up.

SquaredJacketDenimUltra

 

The reason it is on the mannequin instead of me, by the way, is because it was bloomin’ hot on the day I took the photos and I usually relish any excuse not to photograph myself plus my mannequin carries off a jaunty silk scarf much better than me.

Before I start my next project, I must must must – I really must – finish my socks I started back at the beginning of the year and then abandoned (or hibernated, as they call it on Ravelry) .  Remember these?  My two at a time, toe up, striped socks using the tutorial from Heidi Bears.

Two at a time socksWell they are now past the heel and halfway up my leg so another couple of evenings will have them finished but, until then, I am not going to cast on for this pattern called ‘Shale’ from Kim Hargreaves book ‘Storm’.

in this

SirdarDenim UltraBlackberrywhich is Sirdar Denim Ultra again, in Blackberry, and I’m going to use it instead of Rowan Big Wool which is what is used in the pattern.  It is half the price and, after reading some negative reviews on Ravelry about the Rowan yarn, might be a better choice anyway.  I’ve knitted a swatch and I think, by going down a needle size, I can make it work.

But first, I have a pair of stripy socks to finish.

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Hem, Hem…

I haven’t got a cough, I really want to talk about hems.  Or at least let somebody else talk about them .

Colette Patterns Hawthorn Dress

Colette Patterns Hawthorn Dress

 

You know that moment when you’ve made something and you can’t wait to wear it (or give it away or throw it in the bin depending on how the project has gone for you *bitter experience talking*) and then you remember you have to hem the thing.  What a faff.

Anyway, the lovely people at Colette Patterns have been doing a ‘Sept – hem -ber’  (enough with these puns!) on their blog and showing you multiple ways of finishing off your hems to a high standard.

They have kindly produced a free hemming guide as an E-book and you can download it for free here.  How generous!

Do you do anything fancy with your hems or do you just try and get it over with as quickly as possible?  Do you have one of those puffer things to mark the hem level? – seriously, I’m thinking of getting one and want to know if it would be worthwhile, bearing in mind I haven’t got a level floor in my whole house.

 

 

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Redeeming Myself With A Myrtle and Foraging on A Sunday Morning Recommences

Well, you can’t say you don’t know in advance what this post is about unless, of course, you are not a sewer (in the needle and thread sense of the word) and haven’t heard of a Myrtle.

The Myrtle is a new dress pattern by Colette which can be made in stretch fabric or woven and is very easy to make and comfortable to wear and, if my two (yes two!) sewing machines hadn’t thrown a wobbly about doing a zig zag stitch on the stretch fabric I used, it would have been finished in an afternoon.  All was going well until I got to the waistband and had to do a zigzag round the casing for the elastic and, for some reason, still not fathomed, my machine just wouldn’t do it.  I changed the needle, the tension, the thread, the swear words – nothing worked.  I changed machine – still no good.  In the end, I had to use a long straight stitch which I hope will hold.  As is becoming more and more predictable with me lately, it was a little big on the shoulders so I sort of pulled them to the front and did a top stitching doodah with my double stretch needle because I have these things in my armoury and I know how to use them.  So, just to prove I can make a dress that fits me, here it is

Colette Myrtle DressThis really is a quick and easy pattern and the result is very comfortable to wear.  The bodice is cut double on the fold so is self-lined (sounds complicated but isn’t) and, although the pattern stipulates 3 metres of fabric, I only used 2 by being really mean and stingy and folding and refolding the fabric like a miser.  Although I did leave out the pockets as, if I have pockets, I put my hands in them which seems to work for some people but just makes me look slovenly.

Anyway, after it peed down of rain again yesterday, this sunday morning dawned bright and sunny so I hauled myself out of bed and headed for the nearest vide grenier for some serious treasure hunting.  It has not been a good summer here in the South of France this year and, in fact, it has been so bad that I have been jealous of my Mum and Mlle. Tialys the elder who regularly tell me how hot it is in the U.K.  even though I know that us Brits have a fit of the vapours if the temperature goes over 20 degrees C, prompting lots of people to shed layers of clothing in inappropriate places and to labour under the illusion that sunshine makes everybody a little blind and therefore not able to notice the often unseemly flesh on public display all of a sudden.  But, I digress as usual and this morning was a bit of a strange one in that I ended up spending the most money on stuff I’m going to adorn my own house and garden with.

Found this gorgeous antique french comtoise clock which, after a bit of a wipe and a bit of tentative fiddling by Mr. T. looks like this

antique french comtoise clock

All the bits and pieces appear to be present and correct on the inside so I just need to get a pendulum, a winder thingy and two very heavy weights and we will wall mount it and then wonder why we didn’t think of a way to stop it chiming every hour and half hour.

We also bought, from the same flea market vendor, this cart.  It is, we are assured, a market florist vendor’s cart.  Whatever.  It is delightful and once we get the horrible brown paint off and oil the wood, it will be gorgeous.

Antique Florist Cart

A close up of a wheel, just because I took the photo and where else would I show it?

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Lovely spokes!

French Marriage Souvenir

Common in the last quarter of the 19th century and up until the First World War, these souvenirs of a marriage were placed under a glass globe and the bride’s tiara was usually pinned to it  with mirrors symbolizing the time the couple were together before marriage and, as time passed,  the number of children born together with other mementos of the union and of family life.  Must do something about the drips of paint  (how did that even happen?) but what a lovely souvenir.!

Anyway, off to sunnier climes for a few days (I shouldn’t really have to say that when I’m in the south of France) and taking a rest from the sewing machine, Etsy shops and the demands of certain humans, canines and felines alike.

 

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