Posts Tagged Sorbetto top

Stashbusting for Summer Part 4

Another attempt to reduce my fabric stash before I am found buried beneath multiple past purchases and a mountain of ‘to do’ lists.

Almost everyone – in the amateur dressmaking world at least – has probably made a Sorbetto top at some time or another.  It’s a free pattern from Colette which is a simple sleeveless top, embellished with a pleat down the centre to give it a bit of ‘je ne sais quoi’.

I have made many and these are just a few that I can find photos for.

This one was made for Mlle. Tialys the Younger, pandering to her liking for things oriental.

This one which might have been some sort of homage to Vivienne Westwood though I doubt it.  I just liked the tartan.  Actually, I don’t know where this one is.  I must have a rummage through my ironing basket where I put ‘stuff for Summer’ at the end of each Summer when I know it won’t be needed again for a while but, because of my tempestuous relationship with the ironing basket, most of the ‘stuff’ never again sees the light of day.  ***


The lovely Liberty fabric one where I profited from a short sleeve hack that somebody had been kind enough to work out and put for free online.

Then there was the more recent Broderie Anglaise one with Peter Rabbit trim which I made for Mlle. T. the Elder as half of a pair of shortie P.J.s last Christmas.

So, when I wanted to make a pull on over your head, easy to wear Summer dress with short sleeves  (I’d made several such dresses last Summer but sleeveless) I thought I’d try making the Sorbetto top into a dress and I had some of my quilting fabric in mind. I don’t know why I bought so much of this, I usually buy small amounts for patchwork projects, so it must have been on sale or something or maybe I bought it with a dressmaking project in mind.  Who knows or dares to dream? Not me.  But, no matter, I had it and it needed something doing with it.

I made the bias binding for all of these tops and, although I toyed with the idea of making it in a contrast fabric for this dress, I stuck to using the same one for around the neck and the sleeves.  That’s the stuff going through my little bias binding making gadget.

I also toyed with the idea of leaving out the pleat down the centre of the front.  I like to toy with ideas, can you tell?  Anyway, I reasoned that, without it, it would look just like any old plain, short sleeved dress so I left it in.  Now it looks like any old plain, short sleeved dress with a pleat down the front but that’s the look I was going for.

I am all alone at the moment so have no photographer available and, if I can be frank with you, couldn’t be bothered to dig out my remote for the camera, so you’ll have to believe me when I say it looks better on me than on her.

Nothing complicated went on here, I just graded out the pattern slightly from below the waistline to the length I wanted and it worked out quite well.  I always scoop the neck out lower too with this pattern as one woman’s scoop is another woman’s high neck.

 

***  For those of you who care – I just remembered what happened to the tartan top (well it was 2014) and you can read about it here .  No wonder I’d wiped it from my memory although I wasn’t far off with my Vivienne Westwood connection. Read it and weep.

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From Kimono to Sorbetto to Oh, No!

Back in dressmaking mode, I ordered some fabric online.  I know, I know, I’ve got plenty in my stash – although not as much as in my patchwork stash but we won’t go there.  Anyway, I fancied this ‘satin’ type fabric would make a nice kimono style robe to wear in the mornings to replace my big fluffy dressing gown now the days are getting (a bit) warmer.

I searched for a freebie robe tutorial online and found one here 

I should know by now that free online patterns and me do not go together well especially where measurements and calculations are involved but this one seemed very simple.  After all, it basically involves five rectangles.  I did notice, in the comments, some people had found the measurements resulted in a somewhat ‘skimpy’ fit so cut it out a little bigger.  At least, that was until the ‘satin’ slid about under my rotary cutter and I ended up having to trim it up a bit where the bottom layer had shifted out of place.  Pressing on regardless, I got the thing sewn up and looking gorgeous – until I tried it on and realised I couldn’t actually move my arms in a forward direction without risk of hearing the ripping of fabric.

Mlle. Tialys the Younger had admired the fabric so I thought I could salvage enough to make her a Sorbetto top.  This is a free pattern from Colette which I have actually had lots of success with in the past.

All was going O.K. until she tried it on and the shoulders were too wide so I took them in but alterations aren’t my strong point and there was a bit of puffy action going on here and there.

Still, I thought she could live with that and proceeded to bind round the neck and sleeves.

I used commercial binding because I couldn’t bear the thought of making it myself with the satin fabric which moves and shifts and generally makes a nuisance of itself badly enough without trying to make binding out of it.  I couldn’t find any satin binding locally though so used the stuff that is usually available which is of some unknown cheapo material and a bit stiff.  You know what’s coming don’t you?

Flushed with the success of  neck and sleeve binding and wilfully ignoring my better instincts, I bound the hem too.  Which, as you can probably guess, removed the drape and made the hem stand out from the body in a way I couldn’t possibly pretend was intentional.

Shame – the back looked very nice.

If the sleeves had been perfect I would have taken the time to unpick the binding from around the hem but, it wasn’t, so rather than spend more time on what was, in any case, a second go round, I decided there was only one thing to do.

Sometimes it’s just best to move on and get on with your life.

I have learnt some good things about binding and some bad things about slippy fabric so as long as I remember those things next time, which is not guaranteed I’m afraid, the process will not have been a complete waste of time.

I have also learnt that ‘pressing on regardless’ and ‘ignoring my better instincts’ are stupid things to do.  Lessons I’m sure I have encountered many times before but, again, sometimes I live and learn and sometimes I just live

Satin – especially the type that is cheap and creates electricity when you move – is now dead to me.

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